Planting flowers

I love this simple activity. Planting flowers is great for hand-eye coordination and fine motor skills. You can also throw in some language skills by asking/labeling the color of each flower. If the child is verbal and more advance, ask some wh-questions like “What do you do with flowers?” or “Where do you find flowers?” You can also do some pretend play and “smell” the flowers. It’s about keeping them engaged.

Have fun! 

Vocal Stereotypy 

One common characteristic of autism is stereotypy, repetitive movement for no obvious purpose. My little guy has vocal stereotypy which gets in the way during circle time in class. I have been assigned to implement my first intervention, and I have chosen to tackle this behavior.

I made some visuals to help him understand when it’s appropriate to talk and when it’s NOT appropriate to talk. 

I used it throughout his daily tasks last week and his stereotypy has decreased by 50%! There is more to the intervention which involves blocking and redirection, but the visuals are really helping him to control his body. 

I’m really excited for this because it’s the first time I have to write out the program, take the data, graph it, and discuss the progress!! I’ve been using everything I have learned in class: different methods of collecting data and how to use them. I’m on my way to becoming a BCaBA!! 

4th of July Bracelets

Making bracelets is a great short activity to teach several things: patterns, language, hand-eye coordination, and fine motor.

I use physical prompts to show my kiddo what the sequence is. I also lay out a visual prompt of what color comes next.

He knows how to string the beads independently, if he didn’t, I would physically prompt through that as well.

 

Here is the end result. I’m so proud that he even left it on his hand!!

Autism & Montessori: Hand-Eye Coordination

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Simple tasks such as pouring water back and forth helps with hand-eye coordination and adaptive skills for the future. We take for granted simple tasks such as pouring milk into our cereal, because it comes natural for us. But for a child with developmental delays, there is a lot to process: the weight of the cup, the speed of pouring, and the coordination so that it doesn’t spill.

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Switch it up by using different size cups/bottles and different textures. You can even add a funnel for the more advanced learners.

Have fun and it’s ok to get messy!!

*Please note that he should be using both hands. One hand to pour, one hand to hold. He still needs to work on that. Keep an eye out for that with your little one.*

Autism & Montessori: Spatial Awareness

The Montessori classroom is set up so that the child has to be aware of their surroundings. Children have lessons out on the floor, there are tables set up randomly, and the lessons have an assigned spot on the shelves. You have to look where you’re going so you don’t bump into things. I love that all the lessons are placed on shelves. This forces you to look at what you’re doing and coordinate where/how to place the item.

Here, my kiddo is returning his lesson to the second shelf. The long rectangular shape needs precise calculations. He did it!!!

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Autism & Montessori: Promoting Independence

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My favorite thing about Montessori is that it promotes independence. The children have to take care of themselves and are responsible for their stuff. Here, my little guy is washing and drying his plate after eating his snack. He then has to return it to the table and leave it ready for the next child.

This also helps if the child has sensory issues. In the past, I have had clients that didn’t want to touch the water or the rag. With prompting and desensitization, they were able to do it themselves!